Built for the Human Race. That was Nissan’s advertising tag line when the company launched the Z32 version of the 300ZX. After nearly 15 years of gradually softening the original Fairlady Z into a luxury GT hatchback, in 1989 Nissan stunned the world with the CAD-designed (one of the first mass produced vehicles to use this technology) Z32 version of the 300ZX. Nissan decided to drive the car up-market by making it faster, more capable, more advanced, and much higher priced than its predecessor.

1990 Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo Interior

Unlike the Z31, the Z32 was a new design. The body was wider with a rounder profile and fewer hard edges. Twin Turbocharged Z32s also featured active rear wheel steering systems called “Super HICAS”, first introduced on the HR31 Nissan Skyline. The Z32 continued with a 3.0 L V6 engine, however it now featured double overhead cams and variable valve timing labeled “N-VCT” that produced 222 hp and 198 ft lbs of torque in normally aspirated guise. The twin turbo version with dual intercoolers bumped the power substantially to 300 hp and 283 ft lbs of torque, resulting in a 0-60mph time of 5.0 seconds. Removable T-Tops were standard on the Twin Turbo models in addition to a number of luxury features buyers began to expect in their Z-car. The new 300ZX in twin turbo form was so good in fact, that Car and Driver magazine placed it on it’s Ten Best list for the next seven years. Motor Trend named it their Import Car of the Year when the car debuted.

1990 Nissan 300ZX 3.0L Twin Turbo Engine

The seller of this 91K mile Black-over-Black example presented here states the car “runs perfectly” and is “mostly stock except for the exhaust and a few minor things from the previous owner.” It looks like those things include more modern 18″ black aftermarket wheels and a modern smart phone compatible radio.

You can find this specimen near West Chester, Pennsylvania being offered by the private seller for $9,990 on Craigslist by clicking here. Based on the current Hagerty Insurance Valuation Tool, the seller’s asking price is inline with the #3 “Good” rating.