Be Very Afraid: 1963 Ford Falcon Sprint Convertible Project – Sold?

Jan 2020 | Classifinds, Topless Thursday

Update: This one got away, but if you have your heart set on something similar, email us the details of what you’re looking for or call Rudy directly at (908)295-7330

Do you enjoy the smell of heated and scraped old undercoating in the morning?  Does the thought of drilling out hundreds of spot welds make you reach for your best plug-in drill?  Then this 1963 Ford Falcon Sprint listed on Craigslist in Whitehall, Pennsylvania for $3,000 may be just the project for you.  The current caretaker bought this project Sprint in 1990 claims he has not done a thing with it since.  The Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool currently lists the #4 “Fair” (Daily Driver) value as $12,900 and the #2 “Excellent” appraisal is $32,100.  The seller hints he is open to in-person cash offers.  Since he hasn’t done anything with this car in 30 years, we recommend you meet him in person and offer $1,500 cash as that’s what he likely paid for it back in the day.  If you can score this car for less than $2,000, you then have a theoretical budget of $30,000 to bring this Sprint back to its former glory without losing money.  

If you haven’t sensed it already, I speak from a place of experience on this post.  In 1994, I purchased a factory V8-powered, Wimbledon White-over-Rangoon Red Falcon convertible for $1,500 while living in Massachusetts.  Shortly thereafter, my employer at the time relocated me back to Rochester, NY, and even picked up the tab on shipping the car before I proceeded to tear the thing apart over the next three years.  By the middle of 1997, a second child was on the way and I was in the middle of finishing a graduate degree, so all the Falcon did was take up space in my garage.  While I managed to replace the inner rocker panels to a point that the doors could open and close cleanly without sagging, it was still far from finished.  I ended up selling it for what I paid ($1,500) and my lesson was learned.

So, if you have the skills, the equipment, and the space to bring this Falcon Sprint back from the brink, go for it.  This V8-powered four-speed car has good bones to make a nice street machine or restomod. Otherwise, keep looking for a more solid project car to start with.  Good luck with the purchase!

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1963 1/2 Ford Falcon Futura Sport Convertible V-8 4 Speed.
If interested CALL tired of Scammer Texts!
I purchased this car in 1990 and has been sitting ever since. I do not know any of its past history of which did not matter to me at the time because it needed a COMPLETE MAKE OVER.
I was not looking for a numbers matching car and THIS CAR IS NOT! I wanted in todays terms make a Rest-O-Mod.
Body numbers read it is a Bucket Seat Car, 3.25 open rear, 4 speed trans, 260 cu In V-8.
I have been told that this is not a 260 cu. in. V-8 most likely a 289.
Car is not running, car has floor to rocker panel rot, doors open and close with some interference. Trunk area looks good with 1/4 panel lowers replaced at some point. Car is complete and has a clear Pa. Title in my name.
You must come see and make your own decisions and conclusions about this car.
Asking $3000.00 as is- where it sits, No Guarantees or Warranties. Car is located in Whitehall Pa. 18052.
Cash only at time of pick-up.
Open to in person cash offers.”

Do you have a Ford Falcon Sprint story you’d like to share?  Comment below and let us know!

1 Comment

  1. Anonymous

    Interesting write up. I live near by and saw this after I bought my 63 Sprint. Your are right, Sprints are a heck of a deal and are fun cars with their value only going up. This is a sweet car but it is mis represented in the ad. It is not a Sprint but a Futura model. Rare but not the top of the line Sprint. A true Sprint will have “ Falcon” script on the rear, Sprint badges on the fenders, V8 emblems, a tach a chrome dress up kit on the engine and sprint badge on the glove box. Nice write up!

    Reply

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