1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport Hardtop

 

September 22, 2021 Update: The high bid of $100 did not meet the seller’s reserve price of $35,000, so we’ve moved this 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe to our “Rides Still Available” Page. If you are serious about buying this Newport Hardtop, you can click the blue “Buy Now or Make an Offer” button below to navigate to the bidding page where you can agree to pay the $35,000 reserve or enter a reasonable counter-offer we will present to the seller.

GuysWithRides.com is proud to offer this Hemi-powered, driver-quality, 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport Hardtop we are offering online in a reserve price style auction on behalf of the private seller.

Bidding started Wednesday, September 8, 2021, and runs for 14 consecutive days through Wednesday, September 22, 2021, at 6:30 PM Eastern time.

This Fireball V8 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport Hardtop currently resides as part of a private collection in Willow Brook, Pennsylvania, which is less than one hour’s drive from Philadelphia International Airport.

Current High Bid = $100

Reserve Meter – the green bar indicates how close the high bid is to the seller’s reserve price. When the green bar is full, the reserve has been met!

To inspect all of the pictures provided, click on the photograph below to enlarge it and then click on the gray “<” and “>” icons to navigate through all of the other stills in this carousel. NOTE: If you do not see the first picture immediately, please click on the white space and the pictures should start to appear before they are fully loaded.

Following the end of World War II, Chrysler introduced its new postwar three-box, ponton design for the 1949 model year in versions also shared by the Dodge and DeSoto divisions. Chrysler continued to power these cars with its 323.5 cubic inch straight-eight coupled to either a Fluid Drive or Prestomatic four-speed semi-automatic transmissions. Chrysler pared-down body styles for 1949 to simply a two-door club coupe, four-door sedan, and a convertible.

For 1950, Chrysler introduced a new pillarless two-door hardtop labeled the “Special Club coupe” in the New Yorker series. The model carried the sub-brand name “Newport” with script labels placed on the “B” pillars just aft of the rear windows. Another innovation introduced in 1950 was foam rubber padding on the dashboard for safety.

For 1951, Chrysler upgraded the power train. The company’s first application of Hemispherical combustion chambers came in the form of its new 180 horsepower FirePower Hemi V8.  FirePower Hemi equipped cars could accelerate 0 to 60 mph in ten seconds, faster than the Oldsmobile 88 Rocket engine of that time.  The engine subsequently became a popular choice among hot rodders and racers.

Also new for 1951, New Yorker models also offered Fluid Torque Drive, a true torque converter automatic transmission. Cars equipped with Fluid Torque Drive had a gear selector quadrant on the steering column. Another industry first, Hydraguide power steering, appeared as an option on Chrysler cars with the Hemi engine.

For 1953 Chrysler stylists gave the New Yorker a less bulky look when they reduced the car’s wheelbase to 125.5 inches, added a new one-piece curved windshield, and integrated rear fenders into the body. Wire wheels were now an option. Chrysler dropped the lower-priced Saratoga line and renamed its top models “New Yorker DeLuxe”. Convertible and Newport hardtops were available only in New Yorker DeLuxe trim while the base New Yorker offered a long-wheelbase sedan and a Town & Country wagon. 1954 was the last year for this postwar body style, so New Yorkers received only minor trim and color changes in anticipation of the 1955 models that would appear one year later.

Some classic cars grow on you once you see and hear them in person.  This driver-quality, Canary Yellow, 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport is one of those cars. Featuring a true dual exhaust system, the car’s Fireball V8 fired right with authority shortly after we arrived to film the car. Not only does this Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport feature the desirable wire wheel option, that look also extends to the spare tire mounted on a Continental kit. The car appears to feature an older repaint of its original color and we note the blemishes we observed in the picture carousel above. While the interior has wear and patina consistent with a 67-year-old classic, the only trim piece we noticed missing is the passenger side door armrest.  The most notable improvements made to the car during the current caretaker’s ownership include a five thousand dollar re-core of the original radiator as well as a rebuild of the transmission.  The brake system was also attended to during this time. We could not open the trunk during our photography session and as such we could not film the car with the wheel caps in place.  The private seller will provide pictures of the caps will post very soon.

This Newport is currently not registered for the road, so we were not able to drive it, save for backing into and out of the private seller’s garage. However, our undercarriage pictures confirm this to be a solid, nicely running car that retains its original six-volt electrical system.  The garage floor where this Newport has been stored did not show any signs of fluid leaks.  The power steering and automatic transmission made this car easy work navigating in and out of the garage, which is not something that can be said of most early-1950s vintage cars.

To help you make informed bids, we’re providing a link to Classic.com, the analytics and search engine for the Classic Car market, that provides an interactive graph of recent comparable sales in the past two years. By clicking on the green dots, you can navigate to each comparable car sold as a way to help you make an educated bid on the car we are featuring for auction here:

If you have any questions about this 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Deluxe Newport Hardtop, please leave a comment below or feel free to call Rudy directly at 877-468-6497.  Thank you for looking and happy bidding!

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