Potential Project: 1974 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Landau – SOLD!

by | Mar 2021 | Classifinds, Malaise Monday

April 4, 2021 Update – we confirmed the seller of this Monte Carlo “Classifind” deleted their listing, so we’re now able to call this one “SOLD!” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call Rudy directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

Produced from 1973 through 1977, Chevrolet’s second-generation became a highly successful model for the brand during that time.  We came across a 68K original mile example in March 2021 on Craigslist in Mercer, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh) reportedly an unrestored original car with an asking price of $8,000 or best in-person offer.   The visible surface rust in several areas and worn interior have us easily rating this survivor Monte as a solid #4 condition example.  With that information in hand, comparing the asking price against the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool confirms this private seller has their Monte priced between the #4 “Fair” (Daily Driver) appraisal of $6,800 and the #3 “Good” estimate of $10,500. Similarly, the Collector Car Market Review indicates the current asking price falls between this guide’s #4 “Fair” estimate of $3,400 and its #3 “Good” appraisal of $6,725.

The Hagerty Insurance Valuation Tool also provides this synopsis of 1973-1977 Colonade-based Monte Carlos:

“The redesigned 1973 Monte Carlo was a big success for Chevrolet; it was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year” for 1973. The public agreed, setting a Chevrolet sales record with 250,000 units sold, despite the fact that all automakers were being forced to incorporate the newly mandated 5 mph bumpers into their designs. New features such as standard radial tires, a new wrap-around interior styling and one-piece swiveling bucket seats helped the Monte Carlo lead the parade of personal luxury cars into the market.

The Monte Carlo’s leadership position was confirmed in the 1974 model year when, in the middle of the Arab oil-embargo, Chevrolet set a new record with more than 300,000 units sold. The ’74 car received only minor styling changes – most notably the new 5 mph rear bumpers and taller, slimmer tail light housings. 1975 Monte Carlos are virtually identical, except for a new grille and another tail light modification. Mechanically, however, the 1975 models moved to catalytic converters and electronic ignitions became standard.

Spotting a 1976 Monte Carlo is easy, due to the new vertically mounted rectangular headlamps, a new crosshatch grille and yet another tail lamp redesign. Customers liked the moves toward luxury, and the Monte Carlo achieved yet another Chevrolet sales record, moving more than 400,000 units. Ironically, 1976 was the year the venerable 454 was no longer available in a Monte Carlo. 1977 was the last year of the mid-sized Monte Carlo, before being downsized like everything else from GM. Still, the mid-sized Monte Carlo was larger in 1977 than the newly down-sized Caprice luxury car. Aside from minor trim and badging differences, the 1977 Monte Carlo was simply coasting into the future unchanged from the 1976 models, but it lost all performance engine options and became even smaller and lighter in 1978.”

Chevrolet brazenly felt Leonardo DaVinci would have like the Monte Carlo in this vintage ’74 commercial posted on the Osborne Tramain YouTube Channel:

While this Monte Carlo appears to be a solid and unmolested original example, it will need a repaint and possibly a refresh of the interior before the car is show ready.  That said, this is one of those cars that no one would fault you if decided to use this Monte as a basis for a street machine build. 

Here’s the seller’s one-sentence description:

“350CI, 68,000 miles, runs well. $8000 or best in-person offer.

Restore or driver as-is: What would you do with this Monte Carlo?  Comment below and let us know!

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