Six Seater: 1965 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser – Sold?

by | Apr 2021 | Classifinds, Wagon Wednesday

April 20, 2021 Update – We just confirmed the listing for this Vista Cruiser “Classifind” expired, so with no replacement found we’re assuming this ride “Sold?” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call Rudy directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

Oldsmobile marketed their Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser station wagons as comfortable, airy three-row transportation for nine passengers. However, this 1965 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser we came across in April 2021 on Craigslist in Hollywood, Florida is the second of only 1,900 claimed to be produced that is only a two-bench, six-passenger model.  While the first one we featured was slightly modified, this example is said to be a survivor with only 23,700 original miles.  Offered at $19,500 currently, comparing that price against the Collector Car Market Review Online Tool reveals the private seller has their vintage Olds priced between this guide’s #2 “Very Good” estimate of $15,975 and its #1 “Excellent” appraisal of $24,525.  Similarly, the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool as a second data point confirms this private seller has Vista Cruiser priced between the #3 “Good” estimate of $14,100 and the 2 “Excellent” appraisal of $20,100.

Launched for the 1964 model year, Oldsmobile’s first-generation Vista Cruiser pioneered the use of a raised roof with a split skylight that began over the second-row seating, with lateral glass panels over the rear cargo area. Sun visors for the glass came standard for second-row passengers. To facilitate an optional, forward-facing, third-row bench seat, Oldsmobile stretched the Vista Cruiser’s wheelbase nearly half a foot to 120 inches.  Vista Cruisers also featured an elevated roof over the rear seat and cargo area and glass skylights over the rear seating area, which consisted of a transverse, two-piece skylight over the second seat and small longitudinal skylights directly over the rear cargo-area windows.  With sun glare a concern, the second-row seats also featured standard sun visors.  From 1965 to 1970 Oldsmobile dropped the full-sized 88 wagons, making the Vista Cruiser the division’s largest.  The shorter-wheelbase F-85/Cutlass wagon remained the entry-level offering.  Vista Cruisers such as the example presented here come equipped with Olsmobile’s 330 cubic inch “Jetfire” V8 mated to a three-speed Turbo Hydra-Matic automatic transmission.

Here’s a great commercial posted on the Osborn Tramain YouTube Channel focused on the ’65 Vista Cruiser:

If you ever wanted to know what a ’65 Olds Vista Cruiser looked like when new, this ultra-low mileage example is a great benchmark.  With fresh brakes, new tires, and a recorded radiator, this well-documented survivor could have you winning your first Antique Automobile Club of America (“AACA”) Junior Award in Preservation Class before the end of this summer. Good luck with the purchase!

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1965 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser station wagon. One of approximately only 1900 2 seat wagons ever produced. 100% original untouched unrestored car with 23700 actual one-owner miles. Mojave Mist over Black cloth interior. 330 Rocket V8 with a Power Glide transmission. Ice cold factory air conditioning still running on R 12. Power steering, power brakes, power tailgate window, 2-speed wipers, underfloor luggage carrier, tinted windshield, backup lamps, whitewall tires, deluxe wheel discs, deluxe am radio, and outside rearview mirror. This car starts runs and drives as a 23k mile car should. It handles and feels like a new car back in 1965. It has been gone through completely with new tires, brakes and the radiator was re-cored. Everything operates like a new 1965. The paint and interior are all original and in nice survivor condition. Perfect original rust and corrosion-free floors and undercarriage. All the original paperwork is included including the original window sticker.

Show or go: what would you do with this Vista Cruiser?  Comment below and let us know!

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