1948 Crosley Station Wagon – Sold?

by | May 2021 | Classifinds, Wagon Wednesday

May 26, 2021 Update – We just confirmed the listing for this Crosley “Classifind” expired, so with no replacement found we’re assuming this ride “Sold?” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call Rudy directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

Powel Crosley Jr. made his fortune in the automotive parts and accessories business, before diversifying into manufacturing other consumer products and Crosley automobiles in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1925 his company became the largest manufacturer of radios in the world. The financial success of his manufacturing and radio broadcasting businesses provided the funds for Crosley to pursue his lifelong interest in manufacturing compact automobiles. Like other manufacturers, Crosley quickly returned to civilian production after WWII, and this 1948 Crosley station wagon originally listed in Fairhaven, Massachusetts appears to be a driver quality example offered at $7,900. Comparing that price against the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool confirms the private seller has their CC Wagon priced between this guide’s #3 “Good” estimate of $6,500 and its #2 “Excellent” appraisal of $14,800.  Similarly, the  Collector Car Market Review Online Tool reveals private seller has their Crosley priced between this guide’s #3 “Good” estimate of $6,650 and its #2 “Very Good” appraisal of $9,800.

If you’re not familiar with the brand, Crosley Motors was an independent manufacturer of subcompact cars. Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, the small carmaker started producing its line of tiny vehicles in 1939 only to be stopped two years later due to World War II. While the company restarted production after the war, While production remained brisk immediately following the war as consumers were willing to buy anything available, returning veterans wanted big cars and the concept of a two-car family remained a rare luxury.  Consequently, by 1952 Crosley went out of business.

While station wagons such as the example featured here were the most popular model, Crosley also offered sedans, pickups, convertibles, a sports car, and even a tiny jeep-like vehicle.  Crosley introduced several “firsts” in American automotive history, including the first affordable, mass-market car with an overhead camshaft engine in 1946; the first use of the term ‘Sport(s-) Utility’ in 1947, for a 1948 model year convertible wagon; and the first American cars to be fitted with 4-wheel caliper type disc brakes, as well as America’s first post-war sports car, the Hotshot, in the 1949 model year. While production remained brisk immediately following the war as consumers were willing to buy anything available, returning veterans wanted big cars and the concept of a two-car family remained a rare luxury.  Consequently, by 1952 Crosley went out of business.

This appears to be a driver-quality example that easily fits your garage and your wallet, just like when it was new.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1948 Crosley Station Wagon. Solid, original nice running and driving vehicle. Was repainted approx. 30 years ago, but still looks great. Many recent mechanical upgrades including new clutch assembly, carburetor, fuel pump, battery, fuel tank, radiator, and more. Unique piece of automotive history. $7900.00 Calls Only”

Do you have a Crosley story to share?  Comment below and let us know!

1 Comment
  1. Ernest Valtri

    Weeny teeny car

    Reply

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