Six Months Gone: 1950 Crosley Station Wagon Project – Sold?

May 2021 | Classifind Cut, Classifinds, Wagon Wednesday

June 30, 2021 Update – while this “Classifind” expired recently, given the seller’s past history we suspect may not actually be sold yet.  For now, we’re labeling this ride “Sold?” However, we will keep an eye out for an updated listing. In the interim, please reach out either by email or call Rudy directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

May 27, 2021 Update – After a six-month winter hibernation, we just came across a fresh listing for this Crosley station wagon we first featured in November 2020. This time around, the seller reduced their asking price for their disassembled project by one thousand dollars to the current ask of $2,000. If you’re very handy at metal fabrication and repair, this may be the project for you, especially if the sound of thirty-five horsepower from the rebuilt engine is very appealing.

December 1st Update – We just confirmed the Craigslist ad for this ride expired and with no replacement listing found, we’re assuming this car sold unless we come across a new listing for this Crosley.

If you’re not familiar with the brand, Crosley Motors was an independent manufacturer of subcompact cars. Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, the small carmaker started producing its line of tiny vehicles in 1939 only to be stopped two years later due to World War II. While the company restarted production after the war, returning veterans wanted big cars and the concept of a two-car family remained a rare luxury.  Consequently, by 1952 Crosley went out of business.

While Station wagons such as the example featured here were the most popular model, Crosley also offered sedans, pickups, convertibles, a sports car, and even a tiny jeep-like vehicle.  Crosley introduced several “firsts” in American automotive history, including the first affordable, mass-market car with an overhead camshaft engine in 1946; the first use of the term ‘Sport(s-) Utility’ in 1947, for a 1948 model year convertible wagon; and the first American cars to be fitted with 4-wheel caliper type disc brakes, as well as America’s first post-war sports car, the Hotshot, in the 1949 model year.

We came across this 1950 two-door wagon project currently first listed in November 2020 on Craigslist in Ithaca, New York for $3,000 that is now relisted here on Craigslist for $2,000. With the Collector Car Market Review Online Tool indicating #1 “Excellent” restored examples only worth $19,675, taking over the restoration of this classic needs to be a labor of love rather than a pursuit of profit.  If you are serious about buying this classic little Crosley, you can start the conversation by texting the seller at (607) 227-1281.  When you connect, please remember to mention you saw his Crosley featured here on GuysWithRides.com. Good luck with the purchase!

Here’s the seller’s current description:

Complete, but taken apart Crosley wagon. The body has been partially prepped and is epoxy primed. There is still rust-thru in the front floor some dents to fix. The engine was professionally rebuilt by Barry Steel with new, less restrictive intake and exhaust manifolds and now has 35 massive horsepower! It needs to have the interior redone. The car is being sold for less than I have in the engine alone. Clean NYS transferable registration.

Here’s the seller’s original description:

“Complete, but taken apart, Crosley wagon. The body has been partially prepped and is epoxy primed. There is still rust-thru on the front floor some dents to fix. The engine was professionally rebuilt by Barry Steel and with the new intake and exhaust manifolds, now has 35 massive horsepower! It needs to have the interior redone. The car is being sold for less than I have in the engine because I don’t have a transferable registration for it. But NYS DMV will issue one if the new owner provides a purchase receipt for the car. (I originally traded for the car without writing anything up).”

Do you have a Crosley story you’d like to share?  Comment below and let us know!

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