Preserved Plaid: 1977 Ford Mustang II Ghia 16K Mile Survivor – SOLD!

by | Jul 2021 | Classifinds, Malaise Monday

June 21, 2021 Update – After deleting this first Craigslist ad three weeks earlier, the private seller of this survivor quality Mustang II just posted a fresh listing with the same asking price of $7,000 or best offer.

June 27, 2021 Update – we confirmed the seller of this Mustang II Ghia “Classifind” deleted their listing, so we’re now assuming this Mustang II sold.

One of the cars that symbolize Detroit’s fall from grace during the heart of the Malaise Era is Ford’s Mustang II. Downsized and Pinto-based for 1974, the smaller Mustang II was a sales success despite enthusiasts cringing the car had abandoned its roots. The luxury-leaning Ghia model such as this tan over plaid 1977 example currently listed here on Craigslist in Kingston, New York appears to be a 16,000-mile survivor example offered at $7,000 or best offer currently. Comparing that price against the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool confirms the private seller has their Mustang II priced between this guide’s #3 “Good” estimate of $6,200 and its #2 “Excellent” appraisal of $8,300.  As a second data point, the  Collector Car Market Review Online Tool confirms the asking price is two hundred dollars less than this guide’s #1 “Excellent” appraisal of $7,200.

Ford introduced the downsized Mustang II in the Fall of 1973 as a 1974 model available as a four-passenger, front-engine rear-drive compact. Nearly five hundred pounds lighter and almost 19 inches shorter than the 1973 Mustang, the second generation was derived from Ford’s subcompact Pinto platform using a unique unibody with an isolated front suspension and engine mount subframe while sharing a limited number of chassis and driveline components. The steering was improved from the previous generation by using a rack-and-pinion design. Body styles included a two-door coupe and a three-door hatchback that replaced the prior model’s fastback roofline. Ford never produced a Mustang II convertible.

The 1977 Ghia optioned Mustang came with a half vinyl roof, pinstripes, unique wheel covers, bodyside molding, color-keyed interior vinyl inserts, and optional Media Velour cloth with large armrests. A new option for Ghia’s, replacing the Silver Luxury Group, was the Sports Appearance Group, it consisted of Black paint with Chamois half-vinyl roof and interior, vinyl-insert bodyside moldings, pinstriping, luggage rack, lacy-spoke aluminum wheels, sport steering wheel, and black engine-turned applications throughout the interior. The reverse color combination could also be had. The example featured here is a Ghia that does not feature that option.

Launched just as the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo hit while receiving Motor Trend’s coveted Car of the Year award helped the Mustang II achieve over one million in sales over four years of production. Despite all this, the Mustang II is often overlooked by Mustang enthusiasts and prices continue to reflect that.

This 1977 Ford Mustang II Ghia Commerical currently posted on the Classic Car YouTube Channel shows off a Ghia with the Sports Appearance Group. Readers of a certain age likely remember Jackylyn Smith driving a similar example in the Charlie’s Angels TV series:

We love two things about this Mustang II. First is the diamond-in-the-rough, low-mileage survivor vibe.  This car is a week’s worth of detailing away from potentially earning an Antique Automobile Club of America “AACA” “Junior award in “Preservation Original Features” judging.  Second, despite its 130 horsepower when new, it is still the desirable engine to have and prices reflect that.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1977 Mustang II Ghia edition
16,000 original miles on the V8 drivetrain. Garage kept for years. Great daily driver or easy restoration project. No rot. Some light surface rust. All original paint and interior.
A true survivor. Must see to appreciate. Asking $7000 or best offer.”

Show or go: what would you do with this survivor Mustang II?  Comment below and let us know!

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