Stand Up Seller: 1970 Ford Thunderbird Four-Door Landau Sedan – Sold?

by | Jan 2022 | Classifinds, Free For All Friday, NEW Award

March 4, 2022 Update – We just confirmed the listing for this “Classifind” expired, so with no replacement found we’re assuming this ride “Sold?” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call us directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

February 8, 2022 Update – This 1970 Ford Thunderbird received the comment “Thank you for your attention and wonderful post. I have lowered the price to reflect current market prices.” Sure enough, when we checked the listing, the seller had just reduced their asking price by five thousand dollars to accurately reflect the likely sale price of this rare Thunderbird.  We commend the seller and have removed our “NEW! Award title for their car.

When Ford launched the four-seat Thunderbird in 1958, fans of the original ’55-’57 “Baby Bird” scoffed, however, the increase in sales spoke themselves. Nine years later, Ford repeated that success when it added a four-door hardtop version to the fifth-generation “Glamour Bird” line launched in 1967.  This 1970 Ford Thunderbird Landau Sedan originally listed in January 2022 on Craigslist in Allison Park, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh) appears to be an all-original 35.3K mile survivor complete with its factory 8-Track tape player and a white leather interior.

Currently listed for $18,800, comparing that price against the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool confirms the private seller has their Glamour Bird price two thousand dollars above this guide’s #1 “Concours” appraisal of $16,800.  Similarly, the  Collector Car Market Review Online Tool reveals the seller’s ask is $4,500 above this guide’s #1 “Excellent” appraisal of only $14,300. Consequently, we’re awarding the seller our latest “NEW!” (short for “No Effin Way!) Award for their optimistic pricing.

The Thunderbird’s fifth-generation brought the second major change in the car’s design direction since its debut in 1955. From 1958 to 1966, the Thunderbird had remained fundamentally the same in concept as a sporty two-door coupe/convertible with two rows of seating. However, the introduction of the Ford Mustang in early 1964 had created a challenge to the Thunderbird’s market positioning for it. Like the Thunderbird, the Mustang was also a two-door coupe/convertible with two rows of seating. The Mustang had an advantage in that it was substantially cheaper. To prevent overlap between the two cars, Ford’s response was to move the Thunderbird upmarket. The result, introduced for 1967, was a larger Thunderbird with luxury appointments more in line with a Lincoln.

The new Thunderbird abandoned unibody construction in favor of a more traditional body-on-frame design with sophisticated rubber mountings between the body and frame to reduce noise and vibration. Two significant departures from the previous generation of the Thunderbird were the elimination of a convertible model and the addition of a four-door model, which used suicide doors for rear-seat access. The available four-door design remained a unique feature to this generation, as it was not carried on after 1971. One of the most noticeable design elements of the fifth-generation Thunderbird was the gaping, fighter jet-inspired grille opening that incorporated hidden headlights.

The 1970 Thunderbird continued with the same platform and many of the same parts and styling cues used in the 1967 to 1969 models, including the sequential turn signals incorporated into the full-width tail lamps. The most noticeable change was in the front fascia, where a large, prominent projection resembling a bird or eagle’s beak was now used, in line with long, angular lines in the hood. Semon “Bunkie” Knudsen, a former GM executive now president of Ford, is said to be responsible for this dramatic change. The T-bird was offered in coupe or sports-back models for these two years, the latter being a further distinction from the ’67 to ’69 models.

The Mac’s Motor City Garage YouTube Channel features this 1970 Ford Thunderbird commercial that reminds of how much a luxury flying on a commerical airplane once was:

While we can’t argue this 1970 Ford Thunderbird Landau Sedan is a nice low-mileage survivor, it will be interesting to see how quickly this Glamour Bird sells at such a lofty asking price.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“All original with 35,300 miles. 429 thunderjet engine, C6 3 speed automatic transmission, power door, windows, ac, am/fm 8 track, white leather seats, good tires, no rust!​

Show or go: what would you do with this 1970 Ford Thunderbird Landau Sedan?  Comment below and let us know!

1 Comment
  1. Anonymous

    Thank you for your attention and wonderful post. I have lowered the price to reflect current market prices.

    Reply

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