Unutilized Utility: 1951 GMC 100 Pickup – Sold?

by | May 2022 | Craigslist ClassiFINDS, Truckin Tuesday

(To stop the slideshow and expand the pictures, click on the current photograph below)

July 4, 2022, Update – We just confirmed the listing for this “Classifind” expired, so with no replacement found we’re assuming this ride “Sold?” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call us directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

The old saying, “You shouldn’t meet your heroes” sometimes applies when driving vintage vehicles.  We wonder whether that’s the case with the current caretaker of this nicely restored 1951 GMC Series 100 pickup originally listed in May 2022 on Craigslist in Deatsville, Alabama (Montgomery). Specifically, the seller reports,  “I am selling because I do not utilize it. I bought the truck in fully restored condition from a classic car dealer and have put less than 100 miles on it since purchasing.”  Perhaps it’s too nice to haul anything now or maybe it’s too slow and uncomfortable to drive in modern traffic.  Whatever the reason, this New Design era GMC appears to be a nicely restored example based on the pictures provided.

Currently offered for $35,000, Classic.com, the analytics and search engine for the collector car market, confirms the ask is slightly lower than this guide’s one-year results summary across all model years of the GMC New Design generation of pickups.  By clicking on the green dots in the graph below, you can navigate to each comparable car sold as a way to help you make an educated bid on the car we are featuring for auction here:

As a second data point, the  Collector Car Market Review Online Tool reveals the seller’s ask is one hundred dollars higher than this guide’s #1 “Excellent” appraisal of $34,900.

Chevrolet launched its Advance Design line of trucks, the company’s first major redesign following World War II, in 1947 while their GMC counterpart was known as the New Design.  It was billed as a larger, stronger, and sleeker design in comparison to the earlier AK Series. First available on Saturday, June 28, 1947, these trucks were sold with various minor changes over the years until 1955 when GM launched the more modern and car-like Task Force design.

Advanced and New Line trucks relied on the same basic design family used for all of its models including the Suburban, panel trucks, canopy express, and cab overs. The cab overs used the same basic cab configuration and similar grille but used a shorter and taller hood and different fenders. The unique Cab Over fenders and hood required a custom cowl area which makes the Cab Over Engine cabs and normal truck cabs incompatible with one another while all truck cabs of all weights interchange.  From 1947 until 1955, Chevrolet trucks were number one in sales in the United States, with rebranded versions sold at GMC locations.

From 1947 until 1955, Chevrolet trucks were number one in sales in the United States, with rebranded versions sold at GMC locations.  While General Motors used this front-end sheet metal, and to a slightly lesser extent the cab, on all of its trucks except for the cab overs, there are three main sizes of this truck: the half-, three-quarter-, and full-ton capacities in short and long wheelbase.

The gaijinshogun YouTube Channel provides this modern video of what it’s like to drive a similarly restored 1951 GMC Series 100 pickup:

While the seller lets the full complement of two-dozen pictures speak for the condition of this nicely restored 1951 GMC Series 100 pickup, they neglected to provide one of the full engine bay.  If you expand and look closely at some of the pictures, you will find several minor paint chips, so hopefully, extra matching paint is included in the sale to touch those up.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1951 GMC 100 pickup. Fully restored, excellent condition, and garage kept. I have a clear title and I am selling because I do not utilize it. I bought the truck in fully restored condition from a classic car dealer and have put less than 100 miles on it since purchasing.

Show or go: What would you do with this fully restored 1951 GMC Series 100 pickup?  Please comment below and let us know!

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