Not Many Left: 1989 Nissan 240 SX – SOLD!

by | Jul 2022 | Craigslist ClassiFINDS, Free For All Friday

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August 4, 2022, Update – We confirmed the seller of this “Classifind” deleted their listing, so we’re now able to call this one “SOLD!” While this one got away, please reach out either by email or call us directly if you’d like to be informed when we come across something similar.

July 26, 2022 Update – The seller of this unmolested 240SX just lowered their ask from $22,800 to $21,800.

While we generally are supportive of motorsports events that bring young people into the car scene, there is one fatality of the movement to embrace all things drift-car that we cannot abide, and that’s the fact that the Nissan 240SX has become a sacrificial lamb of sorts for everyone under the age of 25 living out their Ken Block fantasies. The S13 chassis 240SX is an exercise in purity, with good looks, rev-happy engines, and sweet, sweet rear-wheel drive. This 1989 240SX is a bare-bones survivor with under 50,000 miles and was originally listed in July 2022 on Craigslist on Long Island with an asking price of $21,800 (the original ask was $22,800.) That may seem like a lot, but comparing that price against the model guide on Classic.com shows us that the average selling price for a 240SX currently is over $21,000:

Remember when you could buy one for peanuts? Yeah, me neither.

The 240SX is more commonly known by its chassis code, which is an S13. The reason for its popularity is not surprising – cheap, rear-wheel-drive, and very much open to the occasional engine swap. What’s more surprising is how popular this model has become all these years later. For instance, the MK2 GTI with the 16-valve engine was a hero car when it was new, so it was hardly surprising that it became a desirable specimen in retirement. The same could be said for the Fox body Mustang GT or the NA-spec Mazda Miata. But the 240SX? It wasn’t exactly a smash hit when it was new, and I can recall hearing more than a few catcalls from armchair quarterbacks claiming it was a secretary’s car. Even though it offered respectable performance and good looks, it wasn’t seen as a track-day weapon like it is now. Still, absence makes the heart grow fonder, and the S13 has rocketed to cult-like status in its golden years.

The MotorWeek Retro Review YouTube Channel provides this vintage test drive of a 1989 Nissan 240SX:

All that said, it’s not surprising to see the seller’s ask on this car as so few 240SXs remain in original, unmodified condition. With just under 50,000 miles and apparently no rust, this 240SX is a bit of a unicorn. It’s an early sport package car as denoted by its wheels, but it also predates the company’s DOHC engine option, so it’s a mixed bag in terms of the out-of-the-box performance. Seeing one of these with a minty bone-stock cockpit reminds me that its appeal goes well beyond its horsepower ratings, as a simple interior with no-fuss ergonomics, supportive bucket seats, and a fun-to-flick manual gearbox all combine in a fairly magical way to be everything you need in a sports coupe. The seller mentions that the last time this Nissan was inspected was all the way back in 2012, so it’s not exactly had an active lifestyle – which makes it one of the few S13s left that hasn’t been touched by a 16-year-old’s hand, or a destroyed by a drifter looking for a track beater.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1989 Nissan 240 SX Hatchback ( 513 generation ) LHD (US model)
KA24E engine 2.4 liter with a single overhead cam, capable of 140hp. 5 speed manual transmission.

Only 48,700 miles! One of the lowest in US

Black with Grey Interior

Original and Highly Collectible without any modifications.

Rear wheel drive

If you’re in the market for a cool 1990’ Japanese sports car, this is the one to watch for!

Clean car fax, no accident, true miles, last time inspected 2012, new tune up..”

S13 envy: Is this one of the best surviving 240SXs left in existence? 

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