NEW! Award 110: 1964 Ford Econoline Panel Van -NOW $15,995

by | Nov 2022 | Classifinds, Truckin Tuesday

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November 20, 2022 Update – The seller replaced their expired listing with a fresh Craigslist ad.  The description, pictures, and reduced price carry over into the new ad.

November 8, 2022 Update – After nearly one month with no sale, the seller just reduced their asking price by another four large to land at the current $15,995.  That’s a reduction of nine thousand dollars, and while its a step in the right direction, its likely still too optimistic based on this van’s condition and the market demand.

October 20, 2022 Update – The seller must have realized they started with too high of a price. Three days after posting their listing, they lowered their asking price by a substantial five to land at the revised ask of $19,995. Still quite optimistic, given the current condition of this van.

In the world of classic vans, those looking to create a customized ride prefer a non-window panel van. The lack of windows creates a blank canvas for the van’s interior for customization.  This driver-quality 1964 Ford Econoline Panel Van, currently listed here on Craigslist in St. Petersburg, Florida, features a rare and desirable Cruise-O-Matic automatic transmission. Additionally, the exterior displays a sixties-style graphic, non-woking side pipes, and Baby Moon hubcaps.  The interior is ready for restoration or customization to the new owner’s tastes.

Currently offered for $15,995 (the original ask was $24,950), Classic.com, the analytics and search engine for the collector car market, confirms the ask is well above the one-year rolling average of this guide’s summary for first-generation Ford Econoline vans produced between 1961 and 1967.  This price guide also groups the much rarer and higher-priced pickups, artificially inflating the guide’s average for sold vans.  By clicking on the green dots in the graph below, you can navigate to each comparable car sold as a way to help you evaluate the price of the Econoline featured here:

As a second data point, the  Collector Car Market Review Online Tool reveals the seller’s ask falls well above this guide’s #1 “Excellent” estimate of $18,700. A third data point from the J.D. Power Online Price Tool confirms the seller’s ask is also well above this guide’s “Low,” “Average,” and “High” retail value range of $3,300, $6,150, and $13,700, respectively.  With the seller asking top dollar for what is nothing more than a solid condition #4 daily driver, we have no choice but to give them our latest “NEW!” (short for “No Effin Way!) Award for an asking price that is more than double what the truck is actually worth.

Like Chevrolet did with its Corvair 95 pickup and Greenbriar van series, Ford developed its first-generation Econoline series based on the company’s new Falcon compact car.  Launched for the 1961 model year, the forward-control, mid-engined chassis relied on a short ninety-inch wheelbase. By placing the engine between the front seats, engineers developed a flat load floor with room for a pair of side doors.  Not only were side doors a more convenient improvement over Ford’s F-Series panel deliveries, but the flat floor was also seen as much more useful to many buyers cross-shopping Volkswagen Transporters or Corvair 95s.

The narrow space needed to place the engine between the front seats prevented the use of V8s.  Consequently, Econolines came equipped with inline six-cylinder powerplants developed for the Falcon compact.  In 1965, the 170 cubic six became standard, with a 240 cubic-inch six introduced as an option. A three-speed manual was standard.  While first-generation Econoline borrowed heavily from the Falcon, suspension-wise, engineers fitted the line with solid front and rear axles, all suspended by leaf springs.

Produced for the 1961 through 1967 model years, Ford offered the first-generation Econoline in several variants. First was the six-door cargo van. In 1963, Ford launched an eight-door version by adding a pair of cargo doors on the driver’s side.  In a nod to classic Sedan Deliveries, in 1964, Ford introduced a panel van with no side loading doors.

The CravingClassics YouTube Channel features this video giving the perspective of what it’s like to drive a restored 1964 Ford Econoline Van:

While this 1964 Ford Econoline Panel Van features a solid rust-free body sourced from California, the seller’s ask is simply out of touch with what the market will bear for these vans.  Twenty-five large is about what they could expect for a properly restored example, not a flat-black painted example with non-working side pipes and lacking an interior.

If you are serious about buying this Econoline, you can start the conversation by calling Larry or Mike at (727) 999-0433.  When you connect, please remember to mention you saw their driver-quality panel van featured here on GuysWithRides.com. Good luck with the purchase!

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1964 Ford Econoline Van with optional 170 C.I. 6 cylinder engine and optional, rare Cruise-0-Matic automatic transmission. Makes it an easy driver. ​Runs great! I have a lot of paperwork for motor work along with Van.​ Brand new brake shoes, ​​brake lines, and wheel cylinders.​ All new rubber around every door and window.​ Glass is in good shape.​ Windows go up and down,​ and every door opens and closes easily​.​ brand new tires, Exhaust side pipes are not hooked up but could be, if desired. The van starts, runs, ​ stops, and rides great!​ All the exterior lights and interior gauges work.​ The exterior is finished in a black primer with an “Old School” panel painted with a custom design. The rear interior of the van has not been finished. A blank canvas for you to finish out your way. Absolute rust-free California van. These early cargo vans are getting hard to find. Thank you for looking.

Yea or Nay: Do you agree with our pricing assessment of this 1964 Ford Econoline Panel van?  Please comment below and let us know!

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