Two Years Gone: 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 – $39,500

by | Jan 2024 | Craigslist ClassiFINDS, Sports Car Saturday

January 27, 2024, Update – The seller replaced their expired Craigslist ad with a fresh listing. The pictures, description, and already-lowered asking price of $39,500 all carry over.

December 21, 2023 Update – Two years after their last Craigslist ad expired, the private seller of this Emerald Green 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 we first spotted in December 2021 posted a new listing. When they first posted their Viper for sale at the end of 2021, the seller’s asking price was $49,750. Fast forward two years and they are now asking $39,500. We do note that the seller continues to use the same pictures and indicates the mileage remains at only 25K.

January 21, 2022 Update – We just confirmed the listing for this “Classifind” expired, so with no replacement found we’re assuming this ride “Sold?” unless we come across a replacement listing.

No exterior door handles, roll-up windows, air conditioning, airbags, or anti-lock brakes.  Side exhaust pipes that can easily burn you and your passenger’s legs.  These adjectives describe some sports cars from the 1950s, not a new Dodge from the early 1990s.  The original Viper is one of the last hairy analog cars for these reasons.  We came across this Emerald Green Metallic 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 for sale, originally listed on Craigslist in December 2021 in Newport Beach, California. Reported to be a one-owner, well-maintained example, the current caretaker reports their Viper has only 25,000 miles.

Prices for first-generation Vipers like this car have been on the rise in the past year, so we are not surprised to see the private seller ask $49,750 for his Viper.  Using the Hagerty Insurance Online Valuation Tool as a guide, the seller has his 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 priced between this guide’s #3 “Good” estimate of $35,300 and its #2 “Excellent” appraisal of $56,800.

In the late 1980s, Chrysler was on roll after successfully recovering from near bankruptcy at the beginning of the decade.  Adding to that newfound success, Chrysler’s Product Manager Bob Lutz commissioned a show car that would be a modern interpretation of the Cobra.  Lutz intended the original Viper to be a performance sports car.  The V10 Powered Viper Concept first appeared at the January 1989 North American Auto Show.  Dodge received such overwhelming positive responses (including reports of customers trying to place deposits at the local dealerships) the company formed “Team Viper” with just 85 engineers in March 1989. This team had its first pre-production prototype ready for testing by February the following year. Another pre-production car paced the 1991 Indy 500 before the Viper RT/10 entered production in January 1992.

The 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 was a groundbreaking sports car that captured the essence of American muscle with its powerful engine, raw performance, and distinctive design. This two-seater convertible marked the second model year for the second-generation Viper, and it continued to embody the classic, no-nonsense approach to performance that made the Viper a legend in the automotive world.

Under the hood, the 1995 Viper RT/10 featured a massive 8.0-liter, 488-cubic-inch V10 engine. This naturally aspirated powerplant was capable of producing an impressive 400 horsepower and 465 lb-ft of torque. The engine was a significant improvement over the previous generation, offering more power and torque, resulting in blistering acceleration and top-end speed. The V10 engine was mated to a six-speed manual transmission, allowing drivers to fully engage with the car’s performance.

The Viper’s exterior design was a head-turner, featuring bold, aggressive lines and a low-slung stance. The 1995 model maintained the classic roadster layout, with a long hood, short deck, and a distinctive side exhaust that not only added to the car’s aesthetic appeal but also contributed to the unmistakable roar of the V10 engine. The lack of a traditional roof and side windows reinforced the Viper’s commitment to a pure driving experience, putting the driver in direct contact with the elements and the car’s formidable performance capabilities.

The chassis of the 1995 Viper RT/10 was built around a steel space frame, providing a solid foundation for the car’s dynamic handling characteristics. The suspension system featured independent double-wishbone setups at both the front and rear, with coil springs and gas-charged shock absorbers. This setup contributed to responsive handling and precise control, making the Viper an exhilarating car to drive on both the road and the track.

In terms of braking, the 1995 Viper RT/10 was equipped with four-wheel vented disc brakes, ensuring effective stopping power to match its impressive acceleration. The braking system was complemented by a standard anti-lock brake system (ABS), enhancing safety and control under heavy braking conditions.

The interior of the 1995 Viper RT/10 was minimalistic, reflecting the car’s focus on performance and driving experience. The cockpit featured simple, driver-centric controls and a no-frills dashboard layout. The standard equipment included leather-trimmed bucket seats, offering a balance of comfort and support during spirited driving. The absence of modern conveniences such as power windows and air conditioning further emphasized the Viper’s commitment to performance over luxury.

Despite its performance-oriented design, the 1995 Viper RT/10 did include some modern features for driver comfort and convenience. These included a premium audio system, power-adjustable side mirrors, and a tilt-adjustable steering column.

In terms of performance metrics, the 1995 Viper RT/10 was a force to be reckoned with. It could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in just over four seconds, showcasing its potent powerplant and lightweight construction. The top speed exceeded 160 mph, solidifying the Viper’s status as a high-performance supercar.

The 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 stood as a testament to American muscle car engineering, combining a massive V10 engine, striking design, and a no-compromise approach to performance. This iconic sports car delivered an exhilarating driving experience that appealed to enthusiasts seeking raw power and a connection to the road. The 1995 Viper RT/10 remains a classic in the automotive world, representing a bold and unapologetic expression of American performance prowess.

In this episode of Jay Leno’s Garage posted on YouTube, Jay takes you through what it’s like to drive one of these no-frills, back-to-basics, sports cars:

The private seller does not provide much of a description other than the car is a “one owner” that has been well maintained.  Another nice feature he does not elaborate on nor shows is the fiberglass hardtop that provides a small amount of civility over the original soft cloth “Toupe Top” which we hope also comes with the car.  With just 25,000 original miles it’s no surprise the body looks straight and what is likely the original paint appears to be in excellent condition.

Here’s the seller’s description:

“1995 Dodge Viper RT, Targa top only 25,000 miles this beast is an absolute rocket ship powered by a V10 with a manual transmission. Vipers were truly before their time and now they have become quite collectible, this is a one-owner and has low miles it’s been well maintained and stored in my private collection.

Show or go: what would you do with this 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10?  Comment below and let us know!

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