Category: Wagon Wednesday

Suburban Substitute: 1950 DeSoto Custom Woodie Wagon – $50,000

Several automakers struggled over the years on how to position certain brands within their portfolio. Prior to its spilt between BMW and Volkswagen, Rolls Royce struggled for many years on how to position Bentley cars. In the U.S., Ford struggled to position its Mercury lineup while General Motors never figured out how to get younger buyers into their showrooms. Chrysler’s problem child was DeSoto.

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Badge Brother: 1955 Pontiac Safari – $87,500 OBO

The rarest body style for Chevrolet in 1955 was the stylish two-door Nomad wagon, with only 8,530 units produced.  If you like the “Tri-Five” (1955-1957) Nomad but find too many have been restored over the years, what is your option for something rarer? Well, many enthusiasts forget that Pontiac offered a brand twin to the Nomad known as the Safari.  Based on Pontiac’s top trim Star Chief line, with only 3,760 units produced for 1955, it stands as the rarest Pontiac made that year.

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Jellybean Jewel: 1995 Mercury Sable Wagon 33K – SOLD!

Ever notice how some cars that were once everywhere aren’t anymore? The first and second generation Ford Taurus and Mercury Sable are one of those cars. When launched for the 1985 model year, their distinctive “Jelly Bean” aerodynamic styling represented a radical departure from the squared-off, downsized look Detroit of the late 1970s and early 1980s.

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Magnetic Message: 1971 Chevrolet Vega Kammback Don Hardy V8 Conversion – STILL $16,500

If you grew up in the 1970s, chances are good seeing pictures of the Chevrolet Vega featured here will bring back memories.  Chevrolet introduced the subcompact H-Body Vega in 1970 as an import fighter that mainly competed against Ford’s Pinto and AMC’s Gremlin. Chevrolet produced the car in four different two-door body styles: hatchback, notchback, wagon, and sedan delivery. A nicely styled small car, Motor Trend named the Vega its Car of the Year® in 1971. However, problems with engine durability, overall reliability, and a lack of rust prevention quickly hung a dark cloud

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Faded Flattop: 1969 Oldsmobile Cutlass Station Wagon 3-Speed 44K – NOW $6,950 OBO

Many Station Wagon fans would love to add a late 1960s, second generation, Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser to their collection.  With it’s three-window sky view roof, the three-row, mid-sized Cutlass-Based Vista Cruiser was a truly a precursor to the modern SUV. However, the Vista Cruiser was not the only version of Cutlass station wagon Oldsmobile offered at the time. 

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Sequential Shift: 1999 Honda Accord SiR JDM RHD Wagon – $12,500

The high water mark in terms of Japanese automotive design innovation and performance was through the late 1990s and early 2000s. Honda was on such a roll during the period that when it came time to launch the sixth generation Honda Accord, the company actually developed and marketed three three separate models tailored for the Japanese, North American, and European markets.  While the North American market offered a very well received mid-size sixth generation Accord sedan and two door coupe, Honda did not offer a wagon version stateside.

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Obscure Options: 1967 Ford Country Sedan 68K Survivor – NOW $18,000

During the station wagon’s heyday, it was common for domestic automobile manufacturers to sub-brand their long roof offerings within their sedan counterpart’s trim lines.  A classic example was at Ford. Throughout the 1960s, the top-level Country Squire was the faux wood paneled wagon equivalent of the Galaxie 500XL; the Country Sedan made do with the mid-level Galaxie 500 trim.

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